New Intel Report Finds ‘Making’ Can Engage Girls in Computer Science and Engineering, Potentially Reducing Tech Gender Gap

  
SANTA CLARA, Calif., Nov. 13, 2014 – A new global report produced by Intel Corporation indicates that girls and women involved with “making,” designing and creating things with electronic tools, may build stronger interest and skills in computer science and engineering – which could potentially reduce the growing gender gap in these fields.
 
With 16 million makers in the United States alone, the maker movement – a wave of tech-inspired, do-it-yourself innovation – is extensive and rapidly expanding. Unfortunately, so is the gender gap in computer science and engineering graduates. Intel’s report, “MakeHers: Engaging Girls and Women in Technology through Making, Creating and Inventing,” explores how maker activities can serve as a gateway to computer science and engineering for girls and women, and it identifies ways to better engage girls and women in making in order to increase female representation in these fields.

Source: newsroom.intel.com

Interesting article. I think girls are very much hands-on, which is why many like crafts and such. (I know that sounds sexist–it’s not meant to be. It’s merely observation.) Many of the tech comm women I know are also heavily involved with knitting, sewing, and other crafts, so it would certainly support this idea. 

 

What do you think? I know I’d like to get my hands on some 3D printers and figure out more about them myself! 

–techcommgeekmom

See on Scoop.itM-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications

About TechCommGeekMom

Danielle M. Villegas is a technical communicator who has recently started her own technical communications consultancy, Dair Communications. She has worked at the International Refugee Committee, MetLife, Novo Nordisk, and BASF North America, with a background in content strategy, web content management, social media, project management, e-learning, and client services. Danielle is best known in the technical communications world for her blog, TechCommGeekMom.com, which has continued to flourish since it was launched during her graduate studies at NJIT in 2012. She has presented webinars and seminars for Adobe, the Society for Technical Communication (STC), the IEEE ProComm, and at Drexel University’s eLearning Conference. She has written articles for the STC Intercom, STC Notebook, the Content Rules blog, and The Content Wrangler as well. You can learn more about Danielle on LinkedIn at www.linkedin.com/in/daniellemvillegas, on Twitter @techcommgeekmom, or through her blog.
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