Confessions of a Failed Technical Communicator

homer_confession

Really, Father, my only sins are beer, donuts, beer, donuts, not knowing DITA, beer, donuts…

“Bless me, Father, for I have sinned! I am a failure in technical communications.”

OK, perhaps in many eyes, I haven’t been a failure in technical communications. It will be five years this spring since I graduated with my Masters degree in Professional and Technical Communication from NJIT. In many ways, that feels like it was just yesterday, and I’m still a “new graduate”. But with the change this year in my STC Membership that’s moved from “Student” to “New Professional” to “Classic”, I supposed I’m not anymore.

While graduate school gave me a good foundation to move forward, I learned very quickly that I needed to continue to educate myself. As I attended conferences and presentations, and paid attention to discussions in social media, I found out that graduate school lessons barely cut the surface. I’ve tried my best to continue my studies by attending as many webinars, conferences, and presentations that I can. I even took another university graduate certificate course on digital marketing, hoping to get some insight that might help me going forward.

However, in the end, I failed to do one thing that might actually boost what I’m doing as a fledgling content strategist, and thus, my confession: I needed to learn DITA.

For those of you who don’t know what DITA is, it’s the acronym for Darwin Information Typing Architecture, and it’s a commonly used method for creating structured authoring using XML coding. The idea is that documentation done using DITA methods will allow for single-sourcing for content elements, and equally make it easier to integrate that content into print or digital outputs in a super-organized, modular way. It’s a standard that helps because it’s generic to almost any system out there. Any system that can read XML can read a DITA document, for the most part. When moving from one system to another, the content can stay intact if done using DITA/XML methods.

I don’t remember learning much about DITA in grad school, other than understanding what it was in general as I explained it above. I never learned the details. In my work life so far, I haven’t needed it.  It’s always been unstructured authoring. I try to take some small steps to create some single-sourcing content when possible in content management systems, but that was hard to do sometimes. One of my recent jobs made me realize that we needed some sort of structured authoring done, but I didn’t know how to go about it. We created our own coding tags to describe things going on in copy decks. It wasn’t the best, but it was better than nothing.

In the past year, I’ve tried to figure out ways to continue to improve my skills, and make myself more marketable as a content strategist/content manager. I talked to the leading experts in the field. (It’s one of the benefits of getting involved with the STC and attending STC events–you get to know these people personally.) And the one thing that seemed to come back to me again and again was that I had a good resume, and I have some great skills under my belt, and they knew that I was a good writer from this blog. The biggest sore spot in my skill set was that I lacked an important skill–knowing DITA and using it.  And while I looked for jobs in my area that included DITA practices (I think I’ve only seen one listing in three years), I’ve been assured that if I could learn DITA, the remote/telecommuting possibilities could be much better for me. And since remote opportunities are my best bet right now, I have to do what I need to do to make that happen.

So, as the saying goes, I bit the bullet. Fortunately, the STC was promoting a course about DITA Essentials taught by Bernard Aschwanden, the Immediate Past-President of the STC, and the proprietor of Publishing Smarter. Bernard’s a great instructor, and he’s taking it nice and slow. One of the best parts of the course is hands-on experience, even if it’s in the simplest ways. That’s the way I tend to learn best–learn the logistics of how something is done, then I need to learn to do the work through trial and error.  Last week’s assignment was particularly challenging for me. While I understood what I had to do conceptually, since I was also trying to familiarize myself with a few XML editors at the same time while applying what I wanted to do with my assignment, I got very frustrated. I sent in my assignment, along with notes about where I was getting frustrated and needing some guidance. Bernard assured me that all would be well, and asked me if he could use what I had turned in for my assignment for the most recent class. He also warned me to have a glass of wine ready while taking class, because I’d be needing it. Yikes!

I was told to prepare for the onslaught of big corrections to my DITA homework with a glass of wine. I took the suggestion seriously, thankfully.

I was told to prepare for the onslaught of big corrections to my DITA homework with a glass of wine. I took the suggestion seriously, thankfully.

The glass of wine was done by the end of the class, and yes, he ripped my assignment apart, but it was okay in the end. I knew there were problems with it, and he showed me where my original thought process was correct, but I didn’t know how to execute it properly. One of the mistakes I was making was my use of XML tags, particularly using the correct ones. While the XML editing apps all have guidance features to help you with using correct tags in certain situations, I still wasn’t using the best choices. Most of that was because I’m not familiar with what these XML tags mean, so I was using them at face value. For example, I was using a step example tag in part of my content, and Bernard understood why I used it, but felt that the way I used it was incorrect, and didn’t allow for cleaner coding. Okay, I can deal with that, especially when he demonstrated the correction.

So, as much as I’m struggling with DITA, I do understand the essential concepts behind it now. My biggest problem is learning how to use it beyond the most elementary tasks. I haven’t had any “real world” scenarios to date when I could implement and learn how to use the XML editors and use DITA practices in writing or rewriting content.  I need to figure out how to find content and start having a way to truly play with something so that I can get the full experience of that trial and error to master DITA.

After the STC course that Bernard is teaching, I plan to follow-up with Scriptorium’s DITA tutorials as well, and see if I can learn some more about XML coding. I have a lot to do to figure this out, but I know that in the end, this will be a big skill that will make a lot of difference in how I approach content. The content strategist skills I already have acquired have helped me frame DITA much more easily than if I learned this with no prior knowledge. But, I can tell that I still have a long way to go before I feel that I’ve mastered this.

So, this ends my confession. I have needed to learn DITA.  If it’s not taught in university classes in technical writing, it should be. I think it would have saved me a lot of frustration, and provided more opportunities for me sooner. If I can get a better handle on this, I’m hoping that I can start exploring how XML Editors can integrate with CMSs, like Adobe CQ. I’m not an Adobe AEM developer (I’m not a developer at all!), but I know how to create websites and pages with AEM, and hopefully I can start figuring out how to integrate those skills with DITA skills. I was told by one mentor, that would make me a very desirable job candidate, and I think she’s onto something. Of course, I need to brush up on my AEM skills, since it’s been a couple of years since I’ve used them regularly, but with all things, once you master them, it’s like riding a bicycle. You might be a little unstable at first, but you never quite forget how to do it once you get started back into it again.

Here’s hoping that in 2017, DITA will become a “bicycle” skill for me. I’ll go say a few rounds of the Rosary in the meantime for my penance.

(What do you think? How important is DITA in technical writing? I’ve heard some say it’s a passing trend, and others say that its usage continues to grow. Include your comments below.)

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Old Way of Thinking vs. New Way of Thinking–Does it work for Tech Comm?

I was casually reading my LinkedIn feed today, and a new connection of mine had liked this particular infographic that one of their connections made, and that connection had obviously gotten it from somewhere else, so I apologize for not being able to name the direct source.

But it’s something that I think is an important part of anyone who is still working and especially for employers who want to understand those who are job seekers. It’s a very different world from even five or ten years ago (trust me, I was job searching that long ago), and while this chart really can apply to anyone, I truly see this definitely applying to technical communications:

infographic old thinking vs new thinking

What got me is that it isn’t generational–a Baby Boomers and Gen X way of thinking versus Millennial thinking.  I’ve had Millennial bosses who thought in the “old thinking” ways, and I’ve had the older generations think in the “new thinking” way.  I think the problem–at least in the United States–is that we operate on a factory mentality from the 19th century that still is in place. (Operating from 19th century thinking applies to our educational system too, but that’s another argument.)  Productivity and profit was made when thinks were much more manually done. Even in a factory with machines, it was always down to productivity and profit, and bottom line to get those things done.  While those are still important factors motivating business now, time has allowed us to reflect on those values, and see the impact on people over 100+ years time. By following the “old thinking” methods, quality of life became impacted. People were things to be manipulated at the cost of time with families, company loyalty, pride in their work.

EVERYTHING in that “new thinking” column embodies what technical communication is right now, and what technical communication jobs should be, but often are not. I’ve heard companies use language that speaks of this “new thinking”, but continue to practice hard-line “old thinking”.  This is the 21st century, mind you, and technology and society has come a long way. It doesn’t matter what you do, whether you are a technical communicator, or a factory worker, or someone plowing a field for crops. The best working conditions are those that embrace the new thinking. It allows workers to be creative with solutions after failure, and allows them to work in a more relaxed setting, and if it’s a matter of behavior over skill, the skills will catch up with the behaviors if they are good ones. Happy workers are productive workers.  Working in a variety of different jobs over the past 26 years have told me that when I’m a happy worker, I get it done. I produce my best work, and my productivity increases, and my bottom line is more willingness to help that company become more productive and profitable. It happens naturally, instead of being forced.

It’s kind of like that kid doing homework who hates school (I have one of these kids). When it’s time to do homework, some kids need someone over their shoulder, constantly making sure that they do it right, they get it done quickly, and they need to do menial tasks that might not really need to be done.  Kids who are given a little bit of room, given tasks that provide some meaning to the material and work they need to produce, and aren’t rushed, tend to get the work done better. Why can’t that apply in the work world as well? We all have deadlines–kids do too. Why not create realistic expectations, which is what much of this “new thinking” is about?

I wish more employers adopted this “new thinking” instead of holding so tightly to the “old thinking”, or at least stop preaching the “new thinking” while actually doing “old thinking”.  It would allow a more open way of working that would allow for creativity and better problem-solving, which would help the bottom line. (In other words, allow for more remote workers to get the best results possible!)

What do you think? Include your comments below.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Adobe Voco ‘Photoshop-for-voice’ causes concern – BBC News

A new tool that makes it possible for computers to mimic a specific person’s voice causes alarm.

Source: Adobe Voco ‘Photoshop-for-voice’ causes concern – BBC News

I didn’t see this article when it first came out, but WOW! A Photoshop-like application that can change audio? At first, it sounds like a really cool app, but as this article explains, it could actually be rather dangerous in the wrong hands.

As content developers, understanding that there are tools like this possibly on the market helps us to understand some of the possibilities and limitations of where we, as technical communicators, can take content to the next level. Who says we can’t take someone’s voice and alter it to read something else, just like reading text of any other source content? Or have the ability to replace an image or other multimedia element that we have now? As the article points out in more details, copyright infringements are a first consideration, but what about security based on voice commands? What about altering audio that gives a different message? Especially after this recent U.S. election, the issue of “fake news” influencing the election would be grossly affected if such technology was already out–it’d be worse than it already is!

Read this article, and give me some feedback about what you think about this upcoming technology. Is it good, bad, or do we need to wait and see how it will be distributed first? Include your comments below.

–TechCommGeekMom

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Back in the job market after a decade? Some things have changed – Chicago Tribune

Jumping back into the job market can be tough under any circumstances but if you haven’t actively looked for a job in more than 10 years, you’re going to be in for a rude awakening. “Everything was different,” say James Trandel, a 49-year-old leasing agent from Schaumburg, Ill. “I used to think I could just count on my skills and my experiences but I was off on a lot of things. I didn’t even have a LinkedIn account. It was a rude awakening.”

Source: Back in the job market after a decade? Some things have changed – Chicago Tribune

A few years ago, I actually gave a presentation at the STC Summit covering much of this information, which I learned the hard way! Even after learning how to do all these steps, it doesn’t guarantee anything, but it sure keeps you viable. This is why I’ve resigned myself to knowing that the likelihood of me getting a full-time, permanent job is unlikely, and I’m always learning new things to try to stay competitive. Heck, even during this writing, I’m taking a class right now through the STC to catch up on a skill.

Read this if you haven’t been looking that hard or don’t know where to start. It provides some good foundational advice for moving forward.

–TechCommGeekMom

(Thanks to Tina Howe for sharing this on Facebook originally!)

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

What Can Technical Communication Do After The U.S. Election?

bill-teds-excellent-adventure-confused

DUDE! What just happened?

In the past week, the United States had an important election for its next President. The election results, to say the least, have been controversial. While I’m not one to usually talk politics on this website, I’ll simply say that this past week has been devastating to me, and has hit me hard. It wasn’t because my candidate lost, but because her opposition, who promoted MANY values which I do not endorse in the least, was elected. There has been a segment of people in my country, that as a result of this new leader’s position, that think that they, too, can engage and promote these inappropriate behaviors, while others are trying to find ways to express and take action against those inappropriate behaviors.

I’ve been thinking long and deeply about how this election affects the technical communications community. I know people involved in technical communications that voted for candidates from both parties. Most of the technical communications community that I know had the same reaction that I did–one of deep disappointment. There were some who were happy for the outcome, but the overwhelming majority of the technical communicators I know were not–including some who aren’t even American citizens and are living outside of the U.S.!

A big part of my disappointment is that the President-Elect, who is not known to choose his words well or speak eloquently, promoted animosity towards people of different colors, people of different faiths, people of different sexual orientation or identification, and women in general. That’s problematic. These are all people who contribute to our society in positive ways, and don’t have any reason to be maligned at all. AT ALL.  I’ve always talked about the technical communications community being my “clan”. During the years I’ve become more involved with the tech comm community, I’ve found that each time I get together with my tech comm bretheren, the diversity among American technical communicators is what makes us an example of how American diversity is supposed to work.  This diversity carries over into our relationships with technical communicators around the world.

A big part of tech comm, especially in the last five to ten years (if not longer) has been embracing the knowledge that globalization and localization is an important key to effective technical communication. Whether it’s for business purposes or otherwise, a large part of what technical communicators do is write with the ability to reach out to the world. Not just their own hometowns, their own states, their own regions, or their own country–they write for a global audience.  With recent events, we are reminded that we need to continue to keep our hearts and minds open to different languages, different cultures, different religions, and different traditions here at home before it even goes abroad.

The other thing that has me very concerned is the economy. The U.S. was in a deep recession before the current President took his office. The economy has recovered, with the unemployment rate easily half of what it was during the recession. I’m definitely one of those people who felt that pinch, but worked hard to end up ahead. During these recession years, I went back to school–and some of it was paid for by my state’s training programs for re-employment–to reinvent myself as a technical communicator. I realized what my skills were, where I had gaps, and I filled the gaps as best as I could. Even now, I still do that. I constantly am trying to pick up new skills to keep myself flexible and employable.

When the world starts getting topsy-turvy, companies react for self-preservation, and that can result in job losses, often for people like technical communicators. It’s the old thing of doing more with less, so hiring stops or slows down until the company can figure out how the election will impact the economy. We’re in that position now, which is not good for those of us who are currently looking for new projects or jobs right now. So as we’ve had to do before, we’ll need to learn to adapt again.

Related to the economy, I’ve been listening to the pundits on television talk about how both political parties ignored a specific segment of disengaged voters from rural America that made their needs known through their votes. We’re feeling the impact of those votes now, but it has opened up a discussion about how to address bridging the gap. The focus of the political parties, according to the pundits, concentrated more on those who were living in the big cities and the suburbs instead of addressing the needs of rural America, or not addressing rural America as much as it should be.

This issue provoked a lot of deep thinking for me. One of my biggest issues related to rural America that I can relate to as a technical communicator has been finding work outside of a large city. While I live in between New York City and Philadelphia–two of the biggest cities in the United States where there are plenty of technical communication opportunities–they are too far a commute for me to go on a daily basis. Now, imagine someone who has a great set of technical communications skills, but then lives somewhere that isn’t anywhere near a big city. What do they do? Additionally, thinking even outside the box of technical communications, why isn’t there more industry spreading out around the country, to bridge those gaps? For example, why doesn’t Apple have offices in the middle of Nebraska that can start to help devise tech tools that can help various types of farmers in the rural areas of the U.S.? That’s not their focus, I know, but perhaps they should start thinking outside of their own box. How could someone in rural America use their products, provided that they could afford them? How would those products help agricultural services grow and prosper? The biggest question of all this is, how can we ensure that rural America is part of the globalization and localization movements? I was remembering that for many years–I don’t know if it’s still in place–that the U.S. Goverment used to pay farmers to NOT produce surpluses of crops. What if we could help them, by allowing farmers to produce whatever they produce, and help them learn how to globalize their businesses with shipping their crops or products made with those crops? When those government subsidies were created, there was no internet commerce, no globalization on the scale there is now. How can we, as technical communicators, help change that view and help that person globalize their business? (Perhaps I’m over-simplifying things here and don’t have a full grasp of economics, but hopefully you understand where I’m going with this thought process.)

Part of that, in my opinion, goes back to two things I’ve talked about many times in this blog. First, we need to make mobile learning a priority, because it’s not just second- or third-world countries that need opportunities to advance. There are already segments within the U.S. that have yelled loudly through their votes during this election that they need it, too. Education is progress, even in rural areas. If someone has a problem with land producing crops, and they only know the old solutions that aren’t working, then technology is going to be the solution in educating them on how to create or learn new solutions.

Second, companies have to start being more flexible towards remote work. Not everyone can get up and move to a big city or large suburban area to find appropriate work. They need to stay in their community for whatever reason. A great solution in figuring out how to extend globalization and localization within our own borders is allowing remote work. That way, that person from rural America can work doing what he/she does best, while still being an active and vital member to their community, and perhaps with the good pay they have, can help to revitalize their local economy, bringing that knowledge to their community instead of having to move elsewhere and not making a direct impact.

The proclivity of technical communicators, from my observations, is that they have big hearts. They have strong ideas, they are organized, and they know how to take action. They are generally open-minded, they think “outside the box” for solutions, and they understand the importance of reaching out and embracing the world because the proliferation of the internet has warranted it.  We can make a difference in how we approach our work, both domestically and internationally, to set an example of best practices of being decent human beings trying to help each other progress and survive in this world.

This isn’t just something that Americans need to do right now, but it’s everyone globally who supports the basic values of every human being being treated with respect and dignity, and providing moral support whenever possible that needs to be part of this. We all have the same human rights and needs. We all need to be able to live together, work together, and survive together. Technical communicators have the ability to shape ideas and processes. We are strategists at heart, whether as wordsmiths, content strategists, or instructional designers, or any other title that falls under the umbrella that describes technical communication.

In the coming weeks, months, and years ahead, we need to figure out how each of us can contribute to this human goal, starting at home. Let’s start with the words from the Wyld Stallions of “Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure”:

bill-teds-excellent-adventure-photo

“Be excellent to each other!”

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

So You Want to Be an Instructional Designer? | EdSurge News

Good listener. People person. Lifelong learner. Sound like you? No, we’re not trying to arrange a first date. These are some common traits of people with successful careers in a booming job market: instructional design. Colleges, K-12 schools and companies increasingly turn to  instructio

Source: So You Want to Be an Instructional Designer? | EdSurge News

I wish I had seen this article several years ago.  Getting into Instructional Design isn’t easy if you don’t have a degree in it, but you still have a lot of the foundational background to break into the field. Some just “fall” into the field, but I have yet to see a job listing for an entry-level instructional designer in the last five years.  Even so, this article will let you know some basics about what it takes to be an instructional designer.

Do you agree with the article’s assessment? Include your comments below.

–TechCommGeekMom

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How Statistics Solved a 175 Year Old Mystery About Alexander Hamilton

What do Alexander Hamilton, Harry Potter, and Bayesian Statistics Have in Common?

Source: How Statistics Solved a 175 Year Old Mystery About Alexander Hamilton

Oh, when I read this, I knew this would appeal to the history geek in me, while also satisfying the tech comm geek in me as well.  When the click bait of this article says, “What do Alexander Hamilton, Harry Potter, and Bayesian Statistics Have in Common?”, you know I went for the bait. And knowing that Alexander Hamilton’s reputation is becoming more relevant thanks to the Broadway musical, “Hamilton”, I thought this would be relevant to share.

hamiltonNot only did I come away with a cool story about The Federalist Papers and statistics, but the thing that kept coming back to me was how tech comm has become advanced enough that we use many of the same techniques in content strategy now.  To be more specific, Mark Lewis and his talks and book about XML metrics instantly popped into my head, and how we use similar statistics to figure out how to economize our content, and provide the best ROI for the content that is created.

Read this article, then go back and read my articles about Mark’s talks about XML Metrics here and here. You’ll see where I was making a connection.

What do you think about this? Do you think that The Federalist Papers project laid the groundwork for XML metrics and other metrics we use today in tech comm? Why or why not? Include your comments below.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment