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LavaCon 2020 is coming up! Get my special discount!

LavaCon 2020 banner

As 2020 winds down, there are still a few more virtual conferences that are scheduled, and among them is the very popular LavaCon.  I have attended them in Portland, and it was my introduction to the tech comm conference scene, and I haven’t looked back!

I’m not able to attend this year, but you can get register $100 off conference tuition if you use my referral code #DanielleM.Villegas.  Select the LavaCon banner above to register and again–use that discount!

I know Jack has some fun things planned–even virtually–so if you can go, do so! And don’t forget to stop by the virtual hall during the conference and say hello to any vendor who you’d might like to meet.

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Why We’re Moving From Content Strategy to Content Design

After over a decade of pushing to make our product experiences simple, straightforward and human, our Facebook Product Content Strategy…

Source: Why We’re Moving From Content Strategy to Content Design

This is interesting, and might help those of us who have been content strategists for a long time finally settle on…something. Finding work has been difficult since marketers have taken over the job title to make it into something that most of us in tech comm aren’t. The explanation in this makes sense, and perhaps going forward in job searches, I can search under “content designer”, with the hopes that those who are putting out the job postings aren’t looking for strictly UX or visual designers (I can do those thing, but on a limited basis).

What do you think of this move by Facebook? Include your comments below.

–TechCommGeekMom

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A plea, to everyone – from content designers, everywhere

Content design is an actual thing It sounds obvious, but content design is a real thing. Before trying to advocate what content designers are, it’s probably easier to explain what they’re not.

Source: A plea, to everyone – from content designers, everywhere

Thanks to Rahel Bailie, who retweeted this article on Twitter.

In the ever-changing world of technical communications, resource needs morph constantly. It’s not enough to be just a technical writer or just a–anything anymore. It’s bad enough that other professional disciplines have co-opted job titles from the tech comm world like “content strategist” when they really want a marketing strategist. Or calling us something that isn’t right. For example, I had the title of “Senior Copywriter” when I either did content strategy or UX writing, not really copywriting.

I like this title of “Content Designer” based on the description. I would like to get more involved in a position that’s like this. However, how long will it be before UX designers or even visual or graphic designers start to co-opt the description for themselves?

One of the difficulties of being a technical communicator is that job titles or descriptions aren’t always clear–especially these days. Something that’s a little more succinct would be nice. For example, it’s usually pretty clear what the requirements for a doctor, a mechanic, a financial advisor, or even a programmer. It used to be clear what various technical communicator positions were. It doesn’t seem to be that way anymore. I’m not sure if that’s a good thing or a bad thing. It’s good in that we are not limited in doing just one thing–we’re allowed to go out of bounds and explore and be multi-disciplinary. At the same time, it can be bad because those multiple disciplines can be endless, and sometimes finding what fits your multiple disciplines doesn’t align in many places, making it hard to find work.

What do you think of the concept of “content design”, or the idea of tech comm job titles having…issues? Include your comments below.

–TechCommGeekMom