The secret “anti-languages” you’re not supposed to know

From London to Timbuktu, there is a teeming underworld of rebellious “anti-societies” who speak a mercurial code. David Robson reports

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.bbc.com

This is another interesting look at how languages evolve, sometimes by unconventional means! It’s sad, if you think about it, that secret languages among many groups had to evolve at all, but this article explains how some of these anti-languages came into being.  

Language and linguistics is interesting! And even if anti-languages aren’t used in everyday language, at least in the business world, then it’s good to know about its existence to have a good understanding of where language has been, and how it’s evolving outside of the "normal" realms. 

 

And yes, "gobbledygook" is a word I happen to use often. ;-) 

 

–techcommgeekmom

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Why native English speakers fail to be understood in English – and lose out in global business

Resented, mistrusted and misunderstood – do native English speakers risk being marginalised in international business?

Sourced through Scoop.it from: theconversation.com

This article provides great insight as to why "international English" does not exist, and why localization of language is so important in business. We may think we are speaking the same English, but we truly are not.  How do we solve this problem? That’s a good question. I don’t know that providing language lessons that improve the skills of those who use English as a second language is the solution necessarily. English is constantly evolving, even within native speakers, and native speakers from different countries don’t even speak the same English, which makes the situation more complicated.  One of the subjects of the story describes translating English into English, and back again. I’ve had to do that with my Spanish speaking in-laws many times, so I understand what he was talking about!  

 

What do you think is the solution, if there is one?  Include your comments below. 

–techcommgeekmom

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Sorry – je ne suis pas circumflex

What’s going on in France? I’m talking about the way some people are reacting to the modest spelling reforms put forth by the Académie Française. According to a New York Times report, no sooner had the Académie proposed removing the circumflex from some words (only in cases where there would be no ambiguity), than Je…

Sourced through Scoop.it from: larrykunz.wordpress.com

I like Larry Kunz’s article here. Language does evolve, and sometimes rules make sense to keep (like Oxford commas), but in this case, I can understand how the circumflex would be useful in some words, and not in others. But that’s what’s amazing about language, as Larry points out. It’s not just English that evolves, but all languages evolve.

 

The French and the Spanish, I know, have academies that closely monitor the French and Spanish languages very carefully. Interestingly enough, I am not aware that the English language has such an academy, other than style guides like the Chicago Manual of Style and similar folks. (Let me know if I’m wrong!) Could this be that the French are starting to have a better understanding of global implications of their language? Perhaps. 

 

The first thing I thought of, even though this is a very small adjustment, is how is this going to effect translational work, especially if it’s machine translation? Ah…there’s a big adjustment right there. Time will tell if this is, indeed, a bold move on the part of the French academy or not. 

 

What do you think? Include your comments below. 

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The State of Mobile Content

Apple is widely credited with introducing the smartphone, and there is no doubt that its iPhone took the world by storm in 2007. But IBM actually had the first smartphone–the Simon Personal Communicator–which was introduced in 1992. Unfortunately, it was just a tad expensive: $899 with a service contract. Because few are even aware of this precursor to Apple’s successful launch of the iPhone, it’s hardly relevant–except for the fact that Apple and IBM continue to duke it out for dominance in the smartphone (and tablet) space.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.econtentmag.com

I read the print version of this EContent article first, and Lin Pophal has done an excellent job in this assessment of where mobile is right now. While the mantras of "Content First" and "Mobile First" have been at each other for the last few years, this article makes a great argument for "Mobile Content First", which is an argument I’ve made for a while.  

 

The article also points out that mobile isn’t going away, and it continues to grow, but many marketers and other authors are still finding their way with how to tap into mobile. It’s definitely got some great stats and points made, and everyone should read this article to get up to speed with what’s going on with mobile. 

 

Nice job, Lin! 

 

What do you think? Do you agree with Lin’s assessment? Include your comments below. 

–TechCommGeekMom

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How Global Is Your English: 8 Ways To Keep It Simple And Save Big | The Content Wrangler

Sourced through Scoop.it from: thecontentwrangler.com

As many know, studying the "global English" or "international English" is one of my stronger tech comm interests. Marcia Riefer Johnston has written an excellent article here for The Content Wrangler that talks about the use of international English, and she provides some solid examples of how better understanding of it helps with writing for an international audience. Read up! This is a worthwhile read (as all things from Marcia are). –TechCommGeekMom

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Lean WordPress: A guide to optimizing your CMS

A guide to optimizing your WordPress CMS. For you and the environment.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: opensource.com

WordPress is a great tool to learn, and fairly easy! The TechCommGeekMom.com blog is built on this platform, in fact. While I feel fairly proficient at using it, there are lots of features that I could still learn. Perhaps that’s a goal for me this year… But in the meantime, read this article to understand more about how WordPress can work as an active CMS, and the benefits of using this readily available, open-source tool that is used globally. –TechCommGeekMom

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» The Changing Landscape of Freelance Workers

Sourced through Scoop.it from: panma.org

This is a FREE event in Philadelphia, and I’m one of the speakers! Did I mention it’s FREE? This is a joint meeting sponsored by PANMA (Philadelphia Area New Media Association) and the STC-PMC (Society for Technical Communication -Philadelphia Metro Chapter) taking place at Wharton (yes, THAT Wharton.) Both groups are great resources for networking and information. This event looks fabulous–whether I participated or not! If you are in the Philadelphia area on February 25, 2016, be sure register today, as seats will fill up fast! I hope to see you there! –TechCommGeekMom

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