Research: Wearable Device Sales Set To Triple in 2014 — Campus Technology

See on Scoop.itM-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications

The number of wearable computing devices sold in the United States will triple in 2014, according to a new forecast from market research firm International Data Corporation, to top 19 million shipments.

Danielle M. Villegas‘s insight:

This seems to be the theme of the week on TechCommGeekMom–wearable technology. It’s interesting to see that fitness wearable devices are leading the way, while the article implies that these are just the beginning. Read the entire article for more details. Emerging technology, people! 

–techcommgeekmom

See on campustechnology.com

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Larry Kunz – This Is The Future We Talked About

This is an STC talk that I had wanted to attend, but had other commitments. Larry Kunz is an experienced technical communicator as well as a frequent commenter on TechCommGeekMom, and I appreciate his support. He always has great insight. Based on the slideshow below alone, he brings up some excellent points about what tech comm is now, and where it’s going.

Here are Larry’s slides from the presentation–take a look!

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Is it a tech toy or an investment?

google-glass-rachel-king-2948When the one-day opportunity to order Google Glass came up recently, I jumped on it. I had tried on Marta Rauch‘s pair a couple months ago, and had seen her presentations about it, and fell in love with them. This was wearable technology I could use, as far as I was concerned! I was able to order the Glass I wanted, and was very excited about it…until I told my husband. I didn’t tell him how much it cost, but I did tell him that I bought them. He totally flipped out, but not in a good way. He felt that whatever I did spend on them, it was too much money for a “toy”. I’m earning some good money now, and I felt it was an investment–I’d like to explore how they are used, and how technical communication and m-learning would be part of the wearable technology experience for myself. But no.  I cancelled the order, as he had a good point about the cost being too high. Even so, I’m really sad about missing out on this opportunity.

Financial considerations aside, it got me thinking about technological “toys”, and what’s truly a “toy” versus adopting early technology, albeit at a high price initially. I’ve heard Neil Perlin talk about how he had some of the earliest portable computers around–nothing like the laptops of today–that cost a small fortune even by today’s standards. Sure, it’s outdated and obsolete technology now, but so are a lot of other technologies that were around just a few years ago. Children today don’t know what a Walkman is, or that telephones used to actually have a cord and you actually used a dial mechanism to connect your phone to another phone. Heck, pay phones are pretty much obsolete now.  What did people think when the first iPhone or the first flip phone came out? Those are obsolete now, too.  So, sure, perhaps Google Glass is a very expensive “toy”, but how does anyone know if perhaps I was really an early adopter and I’d be ahead of the curve for knowing how to make it work and use it for practical reasons if I had actually gotten one?

I remember when I got my first iPad–it was an iPad 2. I had saved up, and asked anyone who was going to be getting me a gift for my birthday, holidays, etc. to give me gift cards to Best Buy so I could purchase it.  I was so thrilled when I got it, and my husband thought that was a waste of money. He insisted that I already had a laptop, and didn’t need an iPad, that again–it was just a toy. I insisted that yes, there were “toy” elements to it, but I considered it “computing lite”, where I could do many tasks that I normally do, but the ones that didn’t necessarily need my laptop to be powered up. Then, about a year later, I was fortunate enough to win an iPad3 so I could upgrade. My husband had insisted that I sell my old one, but for all his moaning that I should get rid of it, guess who’s been using it for almost two years now? Yep, him. It’s still a little bit of a “toy” to him, but he’s a news junkie, and he loves to read different news sources and some light research on it when he’s not using his desktop (nope, he doesn’t even own a laptop). So, it’s not going anywhere. My iPad has gone with me all over the country–on vacation, to conferences, and has entertained me when I don’t need to be in front of my laptop. I’ve gotten my money’s worth out of mine multi-fold. And yet…I feel like this is the same situation.

Of the emerging techologies that are coming out, whether they are wearables or something else, what do you think is a tech “toy” and what do you think could be the next big thing, or a step towards the next big thing? 3-D printers and Google Glass have my attention–I would love to own both of them. What has your attention? Add your thoughts to the comments below.

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My DITA journey begins | I’d Rather Be Writing

See on Scoop.itM-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications

Danielle M. Villegas‘s insight:

This looks like an interesting series from Tom Johnson. I commend him for putting himself out there, in exposing his vulnerabilities as he wades through this process. It’s not easy to do that! I am reading with great interest as I admit that while I know what DITA is, I haven’t had a reason or choice to use it as well, so reading about Tom’s journey into figuring it out will be enlightening as he breaks it down for himself, but also for others like me who haven’t even begun the process. I look forward to the next entries in this new series!  I encourage you to read them as well. 

–techcommgeekmom

See on idratherbewriting.com

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Villegas Views: Are We Looking at Content with Rose-Colored Glasses?

rose-colored-glasses-dan-holmMy new post at the STC Notebook is now up! This month, I discuss issues related to accessibility in honor of Autism Awareness Month (but I don’t limit it to autism issues!).

Read the article.

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The Ultimate List of HTML5 eLearning Authoring Tools

See on Scoop.itM-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications

In this article, you will take a look at how HTML5 may play a major role in the future of the eLearning industry, and delve into the ultimate list of HTML5 eLearning authoring tools available today. So, if you’ve been looking to make the transition to an HTML5 eLearning Authoring tool, you are in the right place!

Danielle M. Villegas‘s insight:

Christopher Pappas has presented a comprehensive list here of tools available for course development, and things to keep in mind while choosing the tools for your use. 

–techcommgeekmom

See on elearningindustry.com

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It’s Like Totally … huh? How The New York Times Got it Wrong | Content Rules, Inc.

See on Scoop.itM-learning, E-Learning, and Technical Communications

Danielle M. Villegas‘s insight:

This is fantastic commentary from Val Swisher of Content Rules, Inc. I admit that a "y’know" will slip in from time to time from me, but I do my best to avoid exactly what’s described here. I cringe the same way Val does when I hear the same verbal faux-pas occurring. It drives me crazy. My best friend, who is an analyst for a federal government law enforcement agency, does this "like" and "y’know" bit frequently, and I’m surprised that she is allowed to work at the level she does with speech patterns as such. Hopefully her writing doesn’t reflect the same thing. This is something to constantly work on, because it’s another example of how verbal language and written language are not the same, but they should become closer together in how they are used. 

–techcommgeekmom

See on www.contentrules.com

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